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Top 10 Underrated Spots in Halifax​ Canada

​Let’s talk about a Candaian city today for all you travel enthusiasts!

Halifax: a city with a colorful history and many attractions that make it an attractive destination for travelers. Despite the fact that the city is not the biggest in Canada, it benefits from a large maritime history, a good location and the status of one of the best natural harbors on our planet.

Its places will capture the thoughts and attention of those who come here. Moreover, the city has many interesting spots that are almost unknown and underrated.

By the way, before reading the article, do you want to look at the top 10 female celebrities? I stumbled across it last week and thought it was interesting!

Anyway, back to Canada:

1. Fort George

It is the largest National Historical Museum in the city. Fortifications were created to protect the inhabitants of the city from the raids of French troops and Indian tribes. Nowadays, exhibitions are held in the fortress, telling about the role of Fort George in the life of the city. Also, there is a museum of the army, the exhibitions of which represent a rare collection of weapons, medals, and military uniforms.

2. McNabs Island

This peaceful, green-covered island near the city center is a true paradise for nature lovers. Because of its strategic location at the entrance to the harbor, McNabs Island served as a defensive zone. Now the island has become an excellent place for recreation and hiking or cycling through forests and abandoned fortifications.

3. City quay

If you want to find the most beautiful spots to walk there, then you can do by it visiting the city quay. There is a variety of ships, and you can take part in boat excursion tours in the summer season. In particular, you can go on an excursion on the amphibian vehicle Harbor Hopper. You will definitely like it.

4. Peggy’s Cove

Go to Peggy’s Cove to admire the iconic pictures of the city – the snow-white Peggy Point Lighthouse, established in 1868, not to mention the stunning local landscapes and nature. The cove is located just over 40 km from Halifax.

5. Point Pleasant Park

This is the park, which the city leased from the British government for 999 years at a tiny rate of 10 cents a year! Point Pleasant Park extends along the Atlantic coast and delights visitors with huge trees, well-marked paths for pedestrians and cyclists, as well as stunning views of the harbor.

6. Province House

The Province House on Hollis Street is the oldest house where the provincial legislature was located. It housed the first overseas British self-government body. Today, visitors can learn more about the current state of affairs and the history of this institution.

7. The Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary

It was built on the personal funds of the Irish Catholics at the end of the XVIIIth. Prior to this, there was a ban on the Catholic religion. Today the church is among the national monuments of Canada.

8. The snow-white Clock Tower

It was installed at the request of the British Prince Edward after his return to England. It consists of 3 tiers, and on the topmost, there are the magnificent antique Roman-style watches, giving it sophistication.

9. Pier 21

It has recently gained fame as the National Museum of Immigration. This is a historical place, a kind of analog of the New York island Ellis, through which millions of visitors passed at one time. Today it is a modern museum with extensive immigration exhibitions.

10. Cape Breton Island

Sit in one of the boats that sail from the harbor of Halifax, and go for indescribable impressions to the deep-water areas far from the coast of Nova Scotia. Watch the giant whales “slide” under the water, and then, cutting the waves, rise to the surface, eject the fountain of water, and again sink into the depths of the ocean.

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What Emma Did

What Emma Did