ION-Sei: Ion Generating Toothbrush Review

Here’s a confession: I’ve never used an electronic toothbrush, regardless of watching my boyfriend stand over the sink twice a day using one himself.

It’s always been something on my ‘must-try’ list (which is a mental one, I don’t physically write these down, FYI), but something I never quite gotten round to doing.

Then, I heard about the Sanyei ION-Sei, and in all honesty, it’s unique Japanese name and design made me listen up. This electric toothbrush – the ION-Sei by Sanyei (Japan) – comes with a unique IONIC Technology, said to help suppress the bacteria that causes plaque and cavities. And when I heard it is the only electric toothbrush available with this technology and its new to the UK, I thought, this sounds pretty damn special.

If I was ever going to cross off owning an elecrtic toothbrush from that mental ‘must try’ list, it has to be for this device, surely. So here I am. Two weeks into using it, morning and night.

And how do I find it?

Firstly, lets look into how it works. It works by generating ions (negatively charged electrons) using a UV light and a Titanium dioxide bar. This makes the brush produce ions (as the name of the toothbrush suggests) which are transmitted to your teeth via water and saliva.

This process works to inhibit bacterial growth and therefore the production of plaque, which results in much healthier teeth and gums. With repeated use, the brush should hopefully prevent cavities from forming.

With the toothbrushes negative electric charge, it is designed to help to suppress any bacterial growth, and any bacteria that is on your teeth should be transferred to the bristles.

Have I lost you? Or is this technology-meets-science lesson quite interesting? Yes, it’s much more to take in than that of a usual, plastic or bamboo and bristle toothbrush. I, however, find it so interesting as I’m pretty keen on learning about ways to keep my mouth in a healthier, happier state. I mean, I’ve luckily never had mouth or teeth problems, but I do sleep with a retainer in to keep them straight and I also had my first and only filling in my late twenties, so it shows that my teeth haven’t remained ‘perfect’.

It’s worth noting that this toothbrush doesn’t come cheap. It retails at around £129, but if this electric toothbrush brings the results in, it could potentially save you from receiving some large dentist bills going forward.

I was told that if I hadn’t had a filling in my mouth by the time I was 25, it’s unlikely I’d ever need one. But then at around 29, I had my first one, and my dentist is always concerned about my wisdom teeth and how crammed in they are, with food getting stuck under little flaps of gum (yukky, I know) and all kinds. So really, I need to be upping my mouth health game, and not assuming that because I’m older and have always been lucky with my teeth and mouth, I should be alright.

After using the ION-Sei after a couple of weeks, I can kind of almost feel the benefits of the ions, if that makes sense. They say this brush is more effective at removing plaque and bacteria from the teeth, and I genuinley do feel that after a good brushing session, my mouth feels completely clean and de-gunked (sorry for the awful word, but that kinda is what I feel).

I’m still learning new things about this modern way of brushing my teeth, including switching the heads around. You get a softer head and a harder head, in which I possibly prefer the soft head. It’s super flexible and feels so gentle amongst my gums and teeth, yet gets into every nook and cranny, leaving me with clean, refreshed teeth and a polished feel.

Because I’m feeling like my mouth is experiencing a very impressive new way of staying healthy and clean, I’ve been constantly researching into this brush so I can feel more confident about recommending it. I mean, I’m loving how it works, along with the unique, sleek design, and the look and feel of both my teeth and gums after using. Then I found out that the bristles move at around 1,000 strokes per minute, which you can’t deny will polish those teeth much more thoroughly and at a higher intensity than a normal brush.

If you’re a little worried about intensity, don’t be too alarmed. There are three modes: sensitive, standard and deep clean. This means that for each one, the vibrations are stronger. I tend to use the standard vibration, which has done the job perfectly for me so far. Plus, the vibrations briefly stop every 30 seconds or so, a little like those vibrating facial devices. You know when to move to a different part of your mouth, until the 2 minute timer is up.

Sometimes I like to brush for 3 minutes, and if this is the case, I just press the button again and the brush resumes at the same setting I was using.

Like all electric devices, you charge this up to get it to work to it’s full power, in which a full charge takes around an hour to one hour 15.

My overall thoughts

Yes, I can’t deny this is pricey for a toothbrush, but my gosh, I first of all adore how it looks in my bathroom. It’s possibly the most stylish and chic toothbrush I have ever seen. Replacement heads cost around £11-£12, but I’m not sure when I’ll need them yet as mine are showing no signs of wear and tear (and the version I have comes with a few heads in it so I’m good for a long while I think!).

The brand is still fairly unknown, but I feel that it won’t be like this for much longer, as it’s unique ionic technology pips the reputation of other sonic care brands in my opinion.

I feel like I’m using the creme de la creme of toothbrushes every time I brush my teeth. It’s almost turned this action into a luxury task. It’s kind of made me look forward to brushing my teeth, as I know my teeth are getting the biggest clean of their life every time, and that I don’t have to worry about bacteria building up as much. After all, this toothbrush does what it says so far, and I’m left with an ultra clean, shiny and healthy set of teeth after every brush.

It’s definitely the future of brushing. You just have to justify the hefty price tag.

You can shop the Ion Sei here.

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What Emma Did

What Emma Did