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How to Build Your Personal Perfume Collection

Everyone talks about having a ‘signature’ scent, but sometimes it’s nice to have more than one. Building a collection of women’s perfume is a great way of being able to match your perfume to your mood, or to the occasion at hand.

Just as we overhaul our clothing wardrobe, we should do the same for our perfume collection. After all, perfume is just as much an accessory as wearing jewellery!

Creating a perfume ‘wardrobe’ is a great way of having the perfect smell for every occasion, whether it’s your day-to-day perfume or something a little more special. Fragrances are deeply entwined with our memories, so whether you’re looking for a nostalgic scent that takes you back to a former life, or you’re ready to make new memories, your perfume collection can help you do it.

So, if the idea of building a new perfume collection appeals to you, here are some top tips to get you started.

Know what you do and don’t like

Perfume is a very personal thing, and everyone’s tastes will be different. You and your best friend may have completely opposite favourites, so it’s important to discover what it is that you like about your perfumes.

Understanding the different scent categories, or families, can be a great starting point. There are many different ones that result in entirely different smells. For example, citrus families comprise of limes, lemons, mandarins and oranges.

Floral, the most common category, is created using a huge array of different flowers for a fresh, flowery fragrance, while oriental scents are often warm and sometimes spicy. If you see the term chypre, expect a woody scent often created with notes of patchouli or leather. Lastly, green scents are often fresh and verdant, like freshly cut grass.

Do your own research

Once you have a better understanding of the various scent families, you can begin to build a picture of your favourite type of smells. A lot of perfumes are created from a combination of two or three families, so it’s key to have an idea of your go-to blend. While there are no rules, it’s often recommended that citrus and chypre are particularly good paired together, as well as green and oriental.

However, it’s important to follow your nose and remember that something that smells good to your friend, may not to you! Look for different options within your favourite scent family to get an idea of what you like and what you don’t. For example, if you often wear floral perfumes, identify what flower scent you seem to wear a lot of, and consider experimenting with other similar bouquets.

This will allow you to broaden your horizon a little more, without completely changing what you smell like!

When will you wear your perfume?

It’s important to identify when you want to wear the various perfumes you have your eye on. For instance, your day-to-day perfume to wear for work or running errands should be noticeably different from your evening perfume.

It’s a popular decision to choose a light, floral scent for the daytime, and a more intense, perhaps oriental-based fragrance for evening. Of course, this is up to your personal taste, but having a distinctive separation is a handy tip to remember!

Always have a classic scent to hand

Once you’ve found a favourite perfume, or perhaps one that you used to wear and forgot all about, it’s a good idea to always keep a bottle of it on your dresser. Having this kind of classic scent is a good back-up for when you’re just not sure what to wear. Just make sure it’s an easy-to-wear perfume that can be sprayed no matter the occasion!

Once you’ve built your perfume collection, look after it! Keep your bottles away from direct heat and light as much as you can.

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What Emma Did

What Emma Did